Cool Devices

Samsung Epic 4G Review

The Samsung Epic 4G from Sprint is the variant of a line of Samsung Galaxy S phones that has been released for the United States. Released in the summer of 2010, it was a hotly anticipated model, but does it live up to the hype? The Samsung Epic 4G is the largest of the Galaxy S line, and comes with the largest price tag as well. Luckily, there is a whole list of knockout features on the Epic 4G that keep it in the running. The good may end up outweighing the bad when it comes to looking at the pros and cons of the popular mobile device within this Samsung Epic 4G review.

Design

The overall look of the Samsung Epic 4G is eye-catching, and yet very sleek and minimal all at the same time. It makes for a tight fit in the pocket with its 4.9 inch length and 2.54 inch width, but the size does contribute to a very solid and high-quality feel. It features smoothly rounded edges and a rich, glossy black color. The Epic 4G has a stunning 4 inch AMOLED display on a responsive touchscreen, which, unlike most phones, is easily viewable even in bright sunlight. The top of the device slides back to reveal a full QWERTY keyboard, making it extremely versatile.

Features

The five-row QWERTY keyboard on the Samsung Epic 4G is spacious and comfortable to use with just the right amount of pressure needed to press the buttons. The device has the basic 3.5mm headphone jack, a micro USB port, micro SD slot, and a front-facing camera with LED flash. Sprint packages the Epic 4G with its charger, a USB cord, and a stereo headset with earbud covers. The device runs on Android 2.1 and uses the Samsung TouchWiz 3.0 interface, plus there are numerous new widgets and extra features available on this interface.

Performance

The worst part of the Samsung Epic 4G is probably its price tag – it is the priciest phone in the entire lineup of Samsung Galaxy S devices and there are extra charges for 4G data and Wi-Fi. However, the phone itself has enough excellent features and quality of design to solidify its place as the best all-around device in the Galaxy S line. The touchscreen display is responsive and intuitive, and the quality of e-mail and web browsing is high. The battery life on the Samsung Epic 4G is decent and the general reception and sound quality is very good.

Product Specifications

  • Android 2.1
  • TouchWiz 3.0
  • 5.0 megapixel camera
  • LED flash photography
  • 4G WiMax network support
  • Wi-Fi hotspot for up to 5 devices
  • Slide-out QWERTY keyboard
  • 4.0 inch super AMOLED display
  • Touchscreen
  • Bluetooth capable
  • As with any new electronic device, there are going to be pros and cons to look at before deciding to make a purchase – and this goes double for a phone as expensive as the Samsung Epic 4G. However, the high quality of the phone’s construction and the list of great features make its high functionality perfectly clear. This Samsung Epic 4G review has found the consensus to be in favor of the Sprint Galaxy S device. The keyboard, responsive touch screen, and high-functioning Internet capabilities make the Samsung Epic 4G a good all-around mobile phone.

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    HTC Desire Z Review

    The HTC Desire Z, a smartphone device created by the HTC Corporation, was release by the American T-Mobile G2 for Canada and many areas throughout Europe. Released two months after its initial announcement due to delays in Google’s quality testing, the HTC Desire Z has most of the same specifications as its predecessors, the HTC Desire and HTC Desire HD. However, there are numerous differences on this particular smartphone that this HTC Desire Z review will show to be unique, like its sliding design, face buttons, and list of handy features.

    Design

    One of the best aspects of the HTC Desire Z’s design is its bright and colorful display. The 3.7 inch screen is smaller than those of the earlier Desire models, but its sharp 480×800 pixel resolution more than makes up for the size. The HTC Desire Z is a solid, heavy phone in aluminum casing, with a full QWERTY keyboard hidden under its screen. Instead of just sliding out in one piece like most keyboard phones, the HTC Desire Z has three different hinges, allowing the pieces to swivel outward in a cool mechanical transformation.

    Features

    The HTC Desire Z has all the basics: a headphone jack, micro USB port, and a 5 megapixel camera. The Desire Z runs extra smoothly on Android 2.2, and utilizes HTC Sense for some extra special touches. The phone’s web browser is Wi-Fi capable and supports 3G, so connectivity is both fast and smooth. It also features a trackpad, but with the smooth and silky scrolling on the responsive touchscreen, it is rarely necessary to use. The HTC Desire Z’s autofocus camera is also equipped to record 720p video, and the camera function is overall well equipped with various filters and effects.

    Performance

    Users who enjoy a physical QWERTY keyboard on their mobile phones will enjoy the smooth, solid buttons and comfortable shape on the HTC Desire Z. With plastic gaps between the keys, typos can be greatly reduced, eradicating the problem usually caused by physical keypads. The trackpad is responsive and smooth, but rendered unnecessary by the scrolling function of the touchscreen. The Desire Z runs on an 800MHz processor, which is weaker than those of the other Desire models though still capable of allowing the device to run well and greatly reduce lagging.

    Product Specifications

    • 3.7 inch display
    • 5 megapixel autofocus camera
    • LED flash photography
    • 720p video recording
    • Android 2.2
    • 3G compatible
    • Touchscreen
    • Full QWERTY keyboard
    • Trackpad
    • 3.5mm headphone jack
    • Micro USB port
    • HTC Sense equipped

    The variety of features and the easy to use, comfortable QWERTY keyboard keep the HTC Desire Z desirable, even though it is considerably bulky and heavy compared to other smartphones on the market. This HTC Desire Z review has also found that it attracts many to its ability to run many apps at once, though doing so can cause its battery life to be shortened. The summary is that its positive qualities tend to greatly outweigh any of the smartphone’s negative aspects.  However, as with any mobile device, simply take the time to research the phone and its specifications to find out if it could be the perfect match.

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    HTC Desire HD Review

    The HTC Corporation’s highly anticipated smartphone, the HTC Desire HD, was first unveiled in the summer of 2010 and finally released for sale in the autumn of 2010. The HTC Desire HD, which runs on Android 2.2 (“Froyo”), was the first phone equipped with a 1GHz Scorpion CPU. Those additions are responsible for giving the anticipated phone capabilities of high efficiency and performance. There are several different notable features on the HTC Desire HD smartphone, as well as some low points which will be brought to light and discussed in this HTC Desire HD review.

    Design

    The HTC Desire HD is one of the largest phones out there, offering a 4.3 inch, 800×480 display screen, which has been debated as being nearly too large to be a genuine pocket device. The Desire HD utilizes a solid new design with a single aluminum unibody, making it both rigid and durable with a heavy, quality feel — a plus, since the phone itself is so large. The side offers micro SD and SIM ports under a single shared plastic cover, which allows for a lot of versatility. The smooth design is comfortable to use and offers a slightly masculine contrast to many of the other smartphones out there.

    Features

    This Android smartphone has a list of decent new features, as well as all of the standards, like its 8 megapixel, LED flash camera with 720 video recording capabilities and micro SD/SIM card ports. Its new 1GHz CPU makes it an Internet browsing workhorse, and its HTC Sense is updated with several nice extra touches. The Froyo-based device has 768MB of RAM, as much as any other smartphone that is currently available out there. Video playback has both Dolby and SRS sound options on the video playback and the device is Wi-Fi, 3G and USB-functional.

    Performance

    The 1GHz CPU packs a punch, making the HTC Desire HD a pleasure to use, especially with its stellar performance in web browsing. The battery life, however, is quickly drained, due mostly to the giant size of the display screen. It sucks the power in no time, so users need to take the charger along everywhere they go. The 8 megapixel camera is average to slightly above average, and anyone who takes the time to adjust the settings and learn about the device’s quirks can take some decent photos and also record fairly high quality 720p videos.

    Product Specifications

    • 4.3 inch display
    • 8 megapixel camera
    • LED flash photography
    • 720p video recording
    • 1GHz CPU
    • Micro SD/SIM ports
    • Android 2.2 Froyo
    • Wi-Fi capable
    • 768MB of RAM
    • 3G support
    • USB support
    • HTC Sense

    Even though there are some mild flaws, such as the poor speaker quality and low battery life, this HTC Desire HD review finds that it has plenty of great features to sufficiently redeem it. Android’s Froyo and HTC Sense give the device extra usability, not to mention an admirable amount of versatility.  In addition, the smooth construction, with its giant screen, are incredibly appealing. Luckily for the HTC Desire HD, its best features and main strengths lie in the areas its users will most likely be accessing and utilizing every single day.

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    Motorola Xoom Review

    The public is always hungry for new gadgets, especially those which can supposedly address multiple needs — the tablet computer is one of those kinds of gadgets. The creation of a lightweight device which marries the large-screen viewing of text and images with the ability to browse the internet and do all kinds of other things is a new concept. The Motorola Xoom, a forerunner in the tablet market that is built to go head to head with its competitors, brings that concept to life. Although it has not made its official debut to the buying public to date, the reactions of those who were allowed to view it at CES provide the basis of this Motorola Xoom review.

    Description

    Motorola Xoom actually mirrors its closest competitor in regards to size: measuring 9.8 by 6.6 in. and weighing 1.6 pounds, it has a slightly larger screen with slightly more weight than an iPad, with a black and silver color palette. The 10.1 inch glass screen has no buttons at all; it’s a completely touch interface, with the volume, power/sleep, and visual controls on the edge of the case. It has dual cameras (2 mp front-facing webcam and a 5 mp rear-facing), a built-in mic, Bluetooth and wired headset, micro-USB, and HDMI access. At the moment, Flash player and SDcard are promised, but they have not yet been implemented into the tablet.

    Tech Specs

    With a dual-core processor (each running 1 GHz), the Xoom is powerful, easily running heavy programs with excellent performance. The OS is Google’s updated Android 3.0 Honeycomb and screen resolution is 1,280×800, with a touch screen keyboard. It has proximity and ambient light sensors, as well as a barometer and a gyroscope, which orients the Xoom to portrait or landscape mode. Currently only a 32GB version with Wi-Fi and 3G network connectivity is available; you can get the Xoom through Verizon for $200 less for the 3G service, but the Wi-Fi only model is not yet available in the U.S.

    Strengths

    The processor speed alone beats the competitor: it is a dual-core that will be very hard to beat. It has more accessibility options as well, and they are offered at lower prices than the iPad’s accessories. The biggest advantage is the operating system, which requires some time to learn if users aren’t Android-savvy, but ends up being more navigable and multitasking friendly than many others. The Xoom also comes with a free future upgrade: the developers know things change, and make provisions for that at no cost to the buyer. When the Flash and SDcard upgrade is ready, all the buyer has to do is take it in for service.

    Weaknesses

    The larger screen feels a bit clumsy except in landscape mode, and it isn’t easy to view in bright backlighting. The Xoom is only available at 32GB right now, and the hazy promise of future upgrades to 4G network is outweighed by the fact that, in order to have 3G network coverage, you have to sign a 2 year contract with Verizon. The future-forward “free upgrade” promise actually means that the device will be in the shop, possibly for an extended period of time. Plus, the case has the buttons in awkward places, and they tend to stick at inconvenient times, like when the volume or brightness need adjusting.

    Although it hasn’t been field-tested by the multitudes, it is hoped that this Motorola Xoom review is helpful in deciding whether to purchase this device. Future input by consistent users will be essential, and more information will be available as time goes by. Users are already clamoring for the device, however, and are likely making preparations to purchase it as soon as it becomes available.  At that point, this review will no doubt be able to become more substantial, because tablet users will likely sound off as soon as possible.

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    BlackBerry PlayBook Review

    Speculation is swirling about the forthcoming release of the Playbook, BlackBerry’s version of the tablet, since the introduction by Research in Motion on September 27, 2010 at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.  For consumers, the biggest question may not be whether the PlayBook can dethrone the iPad or Galaxy Tab, but whether BlackBerry fixed the operating demons that have plagued their mobile devices. The PlayBook was designed with more of a business executive in mind, but it may still be an alternative to other comparable consumer-friendly tablets. Read this BlackBerry PlayBook review to see if the tablet surpasses speculation and the fervent hype surrounding it.

    Design

    As far as first impressions go, BlackBerry’s demons seem to have been defeated, as the tablet has both a user-friendly styling and improved functionality. The BlackBerry PlayBook is incredibly thin and sleek, but the 7-inch LCD screen is still quite impressive. Compared to other tablets, 7 inches is extremely small, but users will hardly notice the size difference because of the screen’s clarity. Weighing in at less than a pound, the BlackBerry PlayBook does not feel flimsy or delicate, but sturdy, indicative of its detailed styling. Though not a physical design feature, toggling between applications is easy and simple without unnecessary lag time, which allows for improved efficiency.

    Features

    Users can synchronize contacts, emails, and applications seamlessly between the BlackBerry PlayBook and other BlackBerry mobile devices, making it ideal for business professionals. Further, wireless connections between the PlayBook and the BlackBerry mobile device work flawlessly for real time access cross-platform interfacing. Dual HD video cameras and stereo speakers allow consumers to video conference without relinquishing performance. The PlayBook has front and rear-facing cameras, providing stunning 1080p high-definition pictures and videos. Additionally, BlackBerry is creating a specific application marketplace to support the PlayBook instead of using their current choices for mobile devices.

    Performance

    The BlackBerry QNX Neutrino is a real-time operating system designed to simplify performance. Without relying on the technology of traditional operating systems, QNX Neutrino is not sluggish, due largely to the fact that it processes information in smaller bits, not traditional large chunks. In the current state, the BlackBerry PlayBook is Bluetooth connected, but not through conventional cellular data. BlackBerry promises that 4G will be available in the future on Sprint, a definite plus over the 3G network AT&T uses for the iPad. Finally, the ability to expand internal storage is yet unknown, but is suspected to be readily available upon launch.

    Specifications

    • 7-inch LCD display
    • WSVGA 1024 x 600 screen resolution
    • Capacitive multi-touch screen
    • 3 MP front-facing camera, 1080p HD
    • 5 MP rear-facing camera, 1080p HD
    • Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n
    • Bluetooth 2.1 + EDR
    • 0.9 lbs
    • 1 GHz Cortex-A9 dual core processor
    • 1 GB RAM
    • 16 GB, 32 GB or 64 GB internal storage
    • 5,300mAh battery
    • MP3, ACC, WMA audio playback
    • 1080p HD, H.264, MPEG, DivX, WMV video playback
    • MicroHDMI, microUSB, charging contact connectors
    • Flexible platform supports WebKit/HTML5, Adobe Flash Player 10.1, Adobe Mobile AIR, Adobe Reader, POSIX, OpenGL, Java
    • BlackBerry Tablet OS (QNX Neutrino) Operating System
    • HDMI digital video output
    • Supports HTML5 and Adobe Flash

    With the release date of the PlayBook still under much speculation, BlackBerry is poised to challenge the newest version of the iPad and other Android-based tablets. With basic models starting at $399 for 16 GB storage, pricing places the BlackBerry Playbook in the upper range of available tablets. The PlayBook has its own, specifically designed OS, so it does not have to rely on a third party platform. This BlackBerry Playbook review is speculative, though the hype suggests that the tablet will be a fantastic alternative to other tablets, especially the iPad.

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    Viewsonic gTablet Review

    Finding the best tablet available is challenging for the average consumer as the market becomes increasingly saturated and competitive. Tablets are designed to be slim and beautiful, in addition to combining the portability of a laptop with the operating power of a mobile device. Though all of them are functionally similar, the real differences between tablets boils down to features, performance, and, ultimately, price. One of the newest products available, the gTablet from Viewsonic, also strives to be technologically innovative while user-friendly. Read more of this Viewsonic gTablet review to see if this new slate lives up to the publicity.

    Design

    The Viewsonic gTablet has a distinctive, instinctual design, with home and search buttons that make it easy to navigate but do not sacrifice its sleekness by adding unnecessary bulk. From the manufacturers of arguably some of the best LCD screens on the market, the gTablet provides a clear touch screen with intuitive touch interaction. Due to the configuration of its 10.1 inch screen, consumers must view the screen from a certain angle or the screen becomes blurry, reducing mobility. The casing is made of plastic, which actually aids in the tablet’s lightweight heft, as well as its durability.

    Features

    Generally, the features on the Viewsonic gTablet are common among other slates available on the market. However, with gTablet is able to have Adobe Flash, which not only allows for smooth gaming, but is also a step up from the tablet’s biggest competitor, which cannot use Flash. Although the user must install the program, this feature is a serious boon for the gTablet. Finally, the “Tap ‘n Tap” interface mimics a common computer desktop, which creates a comforting familiarity for users who are unaccustomed to using tablets or slates.

    Performance

    The operating platform is easy to use for the average consumer, but even those who are a little more tech-savvy appreciate the Android 2.2 (Froyo) OS. However, it must be stated that other Android-based tablets passed over the Froyo, opting for a stronger, more powerful version more suitable for slates. In light of this, the performance of the Viewsonic gTablet to may feel listless and unresponsive to experienced users. Notwithstanding the performance issues, the battery life of the gTablet is unrivaled, boasting nearly 10 hours of continuous use. Unlike other operating platforms, the gTablet is open, allowing knowledgeable users to customize options and software.

    Product Specifications

    • 10.1 inch TFT-LCD multi touch screen
    • 1.55 lb
    • 8-10 hours battery life
    • Wi-Fi capability
    • Bluetooth 2.1 EDR connectivity
    • Mini USB (Host)
    • USB 2.0 (Slave)
    • Google Android 2.2 (Froyo) operating system
    • 1.0 GHz Nvidia Tegra 2 dual-core processor
    • 1.3 megapixel front-facing camera
    • 16 GB internal flash memory (expandable to 32 GB with a SD Card)
    • 512 MB memory
    • 12V Power Adapter
    • Built-in 2 x 1-watt stereo speakers
    • Dock for HDMI, Headphone, USB (optional)

    Much like other slates, the gTablet has regular software updates, fixing bugs and user complaints along with unbeatable customer support. With other tablets waiting for the release of new versions, gTablet is already equipped with a front-facing camera and fantastic stereo speakers, both ideal for video chatting or gaming. Added to this, the gTablet is inexpensive – in some cases, several hundred dollars less – than comparable slates, making it ideal for consumers interested in joining the slate craze for little cost. The overall Viewsonic gTablet review is somewhat mixed: a great, mid-range tablet for those interested in the latest technology but are willing to sacrifice performance and capabilities.

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    BlackBerry Curve 8900 Review

    The BlackBerry Curve 8900 embodies certain aspects which are extraordinarily consumer-friendly and accessible, even to new smart phone users.  However, it does not compromise on its ability to handle the messaging, texting, and camera needs of the staunch Blackberry user. Promoted to be the smallest and sleekest QWERTY Blackberry Curve available, the 9800 model is an attractive and even sexy phone which is considered very pocket-friendly and more accommodating than the Blackberry Bold. A BlackBerry Curve 8900 review follows, and it is devoted to describing its many features, performance capabilities, and specifications.

    Appearance

    There is a reason the BlackBerry Curve 8900 is considered one of the most attractive smart phones ever marketed.  This is due to its sleek, black titanium finish, which is highlighted by brilliant silver chrome and a screen which presents crisp, vivid images. Although it is plastic, the back cover resembles brushed aluminum and is also equipped with a new clip that works much better than the previous Curve’s clip. Also, rather than finding a headphone jack on the left side of the Curve 8900, the jack is now located on the right side of the phone, along with a tiny USB connector that can be used for computer purposes.

    Components

    The BlackBerry Curve 8900 offers all of the connectivity and communication features that BlackBerry is famous for having, such as a list of messaging choices — IM, MMS, or SMS. In addition, email is directed by the BlackBerry Internet Service and can be effortlessly switched between T-Mobile’s network or a Wi-Fi connection. Exceptional multimedia abilities include digital zoom flash, a 3.2 megapixel camera, and video recording and playing. There is also a memory card slot which can hold 16 GB (a 256 MB card comes with the purchase of the phone), a Bluetooth, and over five hours of talk time. Unlimited nationwide calling is also available using a home Wi-Fi system or a T-Mobile HotSpot.

    Performance

    While the BlackBerry Curve 8900 is loaded with all sorts of productive and fun things to do, this model does not carry a 3G. However, there is a full web browser which allows problem-free web surfing and easy multimedia handling. With this smart phone, customers can search for any application they want rather than going through the applications listed on the menu. Also, the full QWERTY keyboard is simple to understand,  facilitated by the easy-to-navigate, friendly interface. In addition, a GPS system is accessible so you are able to “geotag” your pictures immediately after taking them.

    Product Specifications

    • High Resolution 480 x 360 pixel color display
    • 5 key backlit QWERTY keyboard
    • User Interface: Intuitive icons and menus
    • Voice-Activated Dialing (VAD) feature
    • Xvid (MPEG4 Advance), H.263, WMV3
    • Audio Format: 3gp, WAV, MIDI, AMR-NB, G711u/A, MP3
    • Bluetooth v2.0 + EDR: Headset, Serial Port Profile, SIM Access Profile
    • Password protected keyboard
    • 802.11 b/g enabled
    • Wi-Fi access to BlackBerry Enterprise Server
    • North America: 850/1900 MHz GSM/GPRS networks
    • 1400 mAHR removable/rechargeable lithium-ion battery
    • AES or Triple DES encryption with BlackBerry Enterprise Server

    You can also download wallpapers, cool games, and an application called HiFi Ringers which plays actual songs by today’s most popular artists with the BlackBerry Curve 8900. The Curve is also the first BlackBerry to contain spell-check capability, which came as a surprise to die hard BlackBerry users. So when reading a BlackBerry Curve 8900 review, don’t be surprised if you cannot find any criticisms listed other than the fact that it does not have a 3G. After all, the many other features and ease of navigation more than makes up for this minor deficit.

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    Samsung Galaxy Tab Review

    The tablet is the natural progression of a laptop or mobile device, both lauded for their portability and user-friendly interface. Tablets seamlessly combine form and function, and they are proving to be the next, exciting evolution of personal technology. Since Apple is arguably the leader of tablets, many other products strive to reach their success. The exciting, hotly anticipated Samsung Galaxy Tab is possibly the only tablet posed to rival the seemingly untouchable Apple iPad. The ultimate question is whether or not Samsung has created the downfall of the Apple iPad. Read the following Samsung Galaxy Tab review to see if it actually does.

    Design

    Simplicity is beautiful, and the Samsung Galaxy Tab pushes the established envelope of what it means to meld form and function. The Galaxy Tab is considerably smaller than its competitors; its screen is 7 inches a full 2 inches smaller than the iPad and 3 inches smaller than the Viewsonic G Tablet, making it ideal for portability. Its super slick design is visually stunning, but it does requires users to be careful while handling the tablet.  The Samsung Galaxy Tab has minimal physical buttons, boasting only the power and volume buttons, which are neatly tucked away on the side of the slate.

    Features

    The features of the Samsung Galaxy Tab are incredible compared to other available tablets. The Galaxy Tab has two cameras, which is becoming standard: basic mobile front-facing camera and a rear-facing camera with LED flash. A series of ports or docks allow users to not only to connect USB but high-definition multimedia interface (HDMI), allowing the Samsung Galaxy Tab to connect to televisions, computers, and other devices. With full access to Android’s complete applications and the preinstalled programs, the Galaxy Tab is useful and quite beautiful. Unlike other tablets, the Samsung Galaxy Tab is available on a variety of carriers.

    Performance

    The speed to surf the web or use applications is, frankly, unmatched by other tablets; it has actually been described as awe-inspiring. Although the Android platform is still in its infancy as an OS for tablets, the Samsung Galaxy Tab doesn’t suffer from the problems other tablets have. The Samsung Galaxy Tab’s long battery life allows users to play up to 7 hours of movies through a high-definition player, and unlike other tablets, the Galaxy Tab fully supports Adobe Flash. Competing with the formidable platform of the iPhone, arguably the basis of all modern mobile devices, including tablets, the Samsung Galaxy tab not only meets its predecessors’ expectations, the performance surpasses it.

    Specifications

    • 7-inch TFT LCD touch screen
    • 1024 x 600 resolution
    • Android 2.2 (TouchWiz 3.0)
    • 1 GHz Cortex A8 processor
    • 16 GB or 32 GB internal storage
    • Front-facing 1.3 megapixel camera
    • Rear-facing 3 megapixel camera with LED flash
    • 4,000 Ah battery
    • 3G data / voice
    • Speakerphone
    • Bluetooth
    • 5 GHz dual-band 802.11n Wi-Fi
    • Full HD video playback
    • Dock for HDMI, USB and other accessories

    As a slate, the Samsung Galaxy Tab is a sound investment for the consumer who wants the very latest technology without sacrificing features or performance levels. The Galaxy Tab also offers a sync system where users can link email, instant messaging, and calendar accounts quickly and easily. Furthermore, the e-reading capabilities surpass traditional e-readers like the Amazon Kindle or the Barnes and Noble Nook, while being a multi-functional tablet. Overall, this Samsung Galaxy Tab review is very positive: as a more economical version of the coveted Apple iPad, the Galaxy Tab is quite impressive.

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    BlackBerry Bold 9780 Review

    Smartphones are getting more and more capable with every new release, so at first glance, analysts are not exactly sure if the BlackBerry Bold 9780 is high tech and up to date enough to past muster. Their skepticism is mainly due to the fact that, these days, a smartphone without a touch screen is hardly even worth mentioning.  However, RIM does manage to pack some solid features into its new release to make up for that yawning gap in capability. Read the rest of this BlackBerry Bold 9780 review to see where the device really shines and where it’s left in the dust by its competitors.

    Design

    Users who are fans of earlier BlackBerry designs will continue to admire the new model, since the outer look of the 9780 is virtually identical to that of the Blackberry Bold 9700. It features the same 480×360 2.44 inch screen with half of the handset devoted to the surprisingly popular QWERTY keyboard. The keys are relatively small, but with some practice it is very easy to get used to the button placement, and there almost seems to be no need for a touch screen. BlackBerry has long been championed as the best mobile email device, and that legacy continues with this model.  Most users even unanimously agree that heavy typing is much easier on a physical keyboard.

    Features

    Where the outside of the device has remained unchanged, the internal hardware has experienced a number of upgrades. The Blackberry Bold 9780 features 512 Mb RAM, up from the 256 Mb in the 9700 model, which really makes a noticeable difference in how smoothly the OS runs. On the subject of the operating system, the Bold 9780 features the Blackberry 6 OS as well. The built in camera is now 5 megapixels, although the video capture was not upgraded to 720p, which is fast becoming the standard on other smartphones. However, reviewers agree that the camera still has an enviable clarity, making for clear pictures and videos.

    Web Browsing

    While it’s relatively easy to get past the lack of a touch screen in most of the on-board systems, web browsing can get pretty tedious with the physical controls. However, once you look past the controls, the browser itself is very impressive, especially with the tab feature. This feature is used so often on desktops that it is largely taken for granted, but it is still a long way from commonplace in the mobile browsing sector. The Blackberry Bold 9780 has 3G as well as Wi-Fi capability and the quality of the connection is rarely an issue.

    Specifications

    • 3G HDSPA 850/1900/2100
    • 109 x 60 x 14 mm
    • TFT 65k color 480×360 pixel, 2.44 inch screen
    • QWERTY keyboard
    • 256 Mb storage, 512 Mb RAM
    • Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g, UMA
    • microSD up to 32 Gb
    • MicroUSB 2.0 port
    • 624 MHz processor
    • Blackberry OS 6.0
    • 5MP camera 2592×1944 pixels, autofocus, LED flash
    • Standard battery, Li-Po 1500 mAh

    While the lack of a touch screen might first leave new users wary, but they will likely change their tune once they discover the 9780′s new attributes.  As for current Blackberry fans, they will have no problem picking up the Bold 9780 and getting right into it. One of the biggest setbacks that this Blackberry Bold 9780 review found is that the Blackberry 6 OS is actually coded with touch screens in mind, and it doesn’t quite carry over to the keyboard-grounded 9780. However, with a little practice, consumers will find this is a smooth, easy to use phone.

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    Nokia N8 Review

    With so many new phones on the market, selecting the right one can seem overwhelming to many consumers, especially when they aren’t sure what they need. Most users want a balanced combination of style and functionality, and that is what the Nokia N8 is hoping to achieve. Reading a Nokia N8 review can shed some light on the device’s best and worst features, helping make the decisions involved in buying a new phone easier. With a global release and a major emphasis on its photographic capabilities and Symbian^3 touch revolution, the Nokia N8 is already establishing a decent fan base for itself.

    Design

    Constructed from anodized aluminum with shiny chrome accents around the controls, the Nokia N8 has a sturdy, durable, and stylish feel. Although it is one of the larger devices out there, it can still fit in a pocket comfortably, so it does not create a lot of bulk on the user’s person. The buttons and controls have a solid feel, though many users wish that the menu button was more centrally-located. The gorilla glass screen has shown itself to be nearly scratch-proof, and the device overall seems to be built to last. The Nokia N8 comes in a variety of bright colors to suit any personality and has contrasting lines on its edges.

    Features

    The Nokia N8 offers plenty of usage options, including features such as  802.11n WiFi, USB support, a GPS system, Bluetooth support, 16GB of storage, and a MicroSD slot that can handle as much as 32GB more. The Nokia includes an FM transmitter, a pleasant throwback for many users, especially those who still enjoy listening to the radio. However, the definitive feature of the Nokia N8 is its camera, which has gone through a number of improvements and innovations. With a 12 megapixel sensor, its Carl Zeiss lens, Xenon flash, and mechanical shutter, the Nokia N8′s camera is its best improvement yet and produces incredibly detailed and clear photographs.

    Performance

    The Nokia N8′s sound is loud and crisp, and the noise-isolating earphones that go with the device are clearly of a higher quality than those normally sold with mobile phones. The call quality is also above average, with a distinct advantage over the iPhone 4 in a direct comparison. The Nokia N8′s fundamental controls are overall high quality as well, but while the phone’s web-browsing capabilities are generally smooth, there are not many changes made from past models. Its 3.5 inch screen self-adjusts well to the lighting in any environment it finds itself in, which allows for clear viewing in any setting.

    Product Specifications

    • 3.5 inch AMOLED display
    • Gorilla glass scratch-proof screen
    • 12 megapixel camera
    • Wi-Fi capabilities
    • 256MB memory
    • 8-10 hour battery life
    • FM transmitter
    • Video recording capabilities
    • Bluetooth 3.0
    • USB and MicroSD
    • 16GB built-in storage

    The overall Nokia N8 review by its users finds it to be solid as far as fundamental usages, and outstanding when it comes to camera and photographic capabilities. Although the phone’s web browsing capabilities failed to come up with anything groundbreaking, the Nokia N8, being the first Symbian^3-based device, is slowly but surely evolving to keep up with the needs of its technology-obsessed users. The Nokia N8 can cover at least some of every area its users need most, and do it in classic style while providing a wealth of new, innovative features.

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